Information Desk | Glossary of terms

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A

ACCREDITATION, K-12.

Evaluation of a public or private K-12 school by one of the registered accrediting commissions. The accrediting commission for Oregon K-12 schools is the Northwest Association of Schools and of Colleges and Universities (NASCU), Commission on Schools. The Commission on Schools accredits distance education, elementary, foreign nation, high, K-12, middle, postsecondary nondegree granting, special purpose, supplementary education, and trans-regional schools.

ACCREDITATION, Postsecondary.

Evaluation of a postsecondary institution by one of the registered accrediting commissions. The accrediting commission for Oregon colleges and universities is the Northwest Association of Schools and Colleges (NASC), Commission on Colleges and Universities. Specialized accreditation applies to evaluation of programs, departments or schools that usually are parts of a total collegiate or other postsecondary institution. The unit accredited may be as large as a college or school within a university or as small as a curriculum within a discipline. Most of the specialized accrediting agencies review units within a postsecondary institution that is itself accredited by a regional accrediting commissions. However, some of the specialized accrediting agencies do accredit professional schools and other specialized or vocational or other postsecondary institutions that are free-standing in their operations. Thus, a "specialized" or "programmatic" accrediting agency may also function in the capacity of an "institutional" accrediting agency. In addition, a number of specialized accrediting agencies certify educational programs within noneducational settings, such as hospitals.

ADVISOR/MENTOR.

A professional counselor or faculty member who provides information regarding requirements of various programs

of study and career options. An advisor is usually assigned to each enrolled student.

ALUMNI.

Students who have graduated from a particular institution. Many colleges and universities provide continuing services

to alumni. Alumni associations often support the school through fund-raising, alumni magazines, and volunteer activities.

ASSOCIATE'S DEGREE.

An award that requires the completion of at least two academic years of college-level work or the equivalent in

an academic or occupationally specific field of study, and which meets institutional standards for otherwise satisfying

the requirements for this degree level.

ASYNCHRONOUS.

Literally means "not at the same time." An asynchronous course is one in which the instruction is delivered

at one time and the work can be done at a different time. In asynchronous classes, students and teachers use e-mail,

listservs or other technologies which allow them to communicate without having to be in the same place at the same

time.

ASYNCHRONOUS COMMUNICATION

FACE="Tahoma">. Two-way communication in which there is a time delay between a message being sent and received.

AUDIO BRIDGE.

Specialized equipment that interconnects three or more telephone lines (usually operator assisted) to enable conference

calls. The audio conferencing equipment needed to connect multiple sites can be provided by companies specializing

in bridge services.

AUDIOCONFERENCE.

An electronic meeting in which participants in different locations use telephones or audio conferencing equipment

to interactively communicate with each other in real time. The number of participants may be as small as 3 or as

large as 100 or more.

AUDIOGRAPHICS.

Computer-based technology that permits simultaneous transmission of voice, data communication, and graphic images

across local telephone lines in a way that is interactive between instructor and all participants.


B

BACHELOR'S DEGREE.

An award that requires the completion of at least four academic years of college-level work or the equivalent in

an academic or occupationally specific field of study, and which meets institutional standards for otherwise satisfying

the requirements for this degree level. Also called a Baccalaureate degree.

BACKUP FILE.

Copy of a computer file from a floppy disc or hard disc made to ensure that data are preserved if the original

file is damaged or destroyed.

BROWSER.

Software that allows you to "surf" the Internet. Netscape, Mosaic, and Internet Explorer are examples

of Web browsers. A browser provides an easy-to-use interface for accessing the information on the World Wide Web.


C

CABLE TELEVISION.

Use of a broadband coaxial or fiber optic cable to deliver video signals directly to television sets. Current systems

can deliver signals in both directions.

CAD (COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN)

FACE="Tahoma">. In graphics, the computer-assisted production of drawings and plans.

CAI (COMPUTER-AIDED INSTRUCTION)

FACE="Tahoma">. Instruction delivered with the assistance of a computer. The student interacts with the computer

and proceeds at his or her own speed. CAI software is commonly classified into these categories: drill-and-practice;

tutorial; simulation; educational games; problem solving; applications.

CATALOG.

A list of all courses, typically including course title, course number, description, prerequisite(s), and other

requirements for the course. Catalogs may also contain other information pertinent to courses (programs related

to courses, information about the institutions that provide the courses, etc.) A "searchable" catalog

enables users to search for courses by a variety of descriptors: e.g., subject area of course, institution providing

the course, level of course (undergraduate/graduate-level), delivery mode, etc.

CERTIFICATE.

An award offered to recognize the work performed and skills or learning acquired by taking a particular class or

series of classes. It may or may not apply toward a license or other degree.

CHAT. When

two or more computer users can see and respond to messages as they are typed into a computer.

CIP Number

- A national system, or uniform code, for numbering courses (CIP= Classification of Instructional Program).

CLASS. An

individual instance of a course which takes place at a specified time and/or place. There may be many classes of

the same course in one term. Distance Education classes may consist of a certain group of students who begin and

end a course together.

COHORT.

Refers to a group of people who experience a similar set of events in the same time period, such as people who

lived in the U.S. during the depression, or a group of students who begin a program or course of study together.

Nursing students who started the program in the Fall of 1999 form a cohort.

COMPACT DISC (CD).

High density storage media based on a 4.75" reflective optical disc. Can hold up to 650,000,000 bytes of data,

that is equivalent to 12,000 images or 200,000 pages of text. CDS may all look the same, but there are numerous

standards for different applications. The most common are defined below.

COMPACT DISC INTERACTIVE (CD-I)

FACE="Tahoma">. An interactive product in which still images, computer graphics, audio and computer data are stored

on one disc. This technology is available in the consumer entertainment industry, and it has great potential for

education.

COMPACT DISC READ-ONLY MEMORY (CD-ROM)

COLOR="black" FACE="Tahoma">. Version of the CD that allows the information to be stored and retrieved. Once a

CD-ROM is pressed, new data cannot be stored and the disc cannot be erased for reuse. Although CD-ROMs look like

music discs, they can only be used with a computer equipped with a CD-ROM drive.

COMPACT DISC/READ ONLY MEMORY EXTENDED ARCHITECTURE (CD-ROM XA)

SIZE="2" COLOR="black" FACE="Tahoma">. A CD-I format with computer data, video and audio that has been designed

for use as a computer peripheral. See compact disc interactive.

COMPACT DISC-RECORDABLE (CD-R)

FACE="Tahoma">. CD-ROM recording systems can be used to record data onto a compact disc-recordable like any other

recordable media. However, they cannot be erased and re-recorded. For large-scale duplication of CD-ROMs, a pressing

facility is preferred.

COMPUTER-ASSISTED INSTRUCTION (CAI)

FACE="Tahoma">. See CAI.

COMPUTER-BASED TRAINING (CBT)

FACE="Tahoma">. Courses using the computer as the primary delivery method of instruction. No textbook is required.

It may be self-paced, a self-contained interactive instruction on a CD, or instruction through e-mail and small

group computer conferences with other students. The term CBT is often used interchangeably with Computer- Assisted

Instruction (CAI).

COMPUTER CONFERENCING.

An ongoing computer conversation via text with others in different locations. Conferencing can be done in "real

time," so that messages appear as they are being keyed, or it can be "asynchronous," which means

the complete message is keyed and then stored for later use by the receiver or sender.

CONTINUING EDUCATION.

Courses, programs, or organized learning experiences usually taken after a degree is obtained to enhance personal

or professional goals. Distance Education courses are often listed within the Continuing Education Department at

universities.

CORRESPONDENCE COURSE.

A course offered primarily through print media. All textbooks, study guides, assignments, and tests are provided

to the student's preferred mailing address. Faculty stay in touch with students through mail, email, telephone,

and FAX.

COURSE.

A focused body of instruction offered by an education provider. A course may be made up of one or more classes.

CREDENTIAL.

A degree, certificate or award which recognizes a course of study taken in a certain area, and acknowledges the

skills, knowledge and competencies acquired. An example is a teaching credential.

CREDIT.

A unit of measure used in higher education. Recognition of attendance and/or performance in an instructional activity

(course or program) that can be applied by a recipient to requirements for a degree, diploma, certificate, or other

formal award. At some institutions a credit is the equivalent to the number of contact hours. For example, English

101 is offered Mondays and Wednesdays from 5:30 - 7:00 p.m. for 3 credits. How credits equate to contact hours

vary at each institution. Also referred to as academic credit.

CREDIT HOUR.

An hour (50 minutes) of instruction given over a 15-week period in a semester or trimester system or a 10-week

period in a quarter system. It is applied toward the total number of hours needed for completing the requirements

of a traditional, credit-based degree, diploma, certificate or other formal award.


D

DEGREE.

An award conferred by a college, university, or other postsecondary educational institution as official recognition

for the successful completion of a program of studies.

DELIVERY MODE.

The primary method or technology used to deliver instructional information to the student and used for communication

between the instructor and the students.

DESKTOP PUBLISHING.

Software programs that enable the user to use a microcomputer and a laser or color printer to produce relatively

high-quality publications.

DESKTOP VIDEOCONFERENCING

FACE="Tahoma">. Videoconferencing on a personal computer equipped with a fast Internet connection (at least 28.8

Kbps modem), a microphone, and a video camera. There can be two-way or multi-way video and audio depending upon

the hardware and software of participants. Most appropriate for small groups or individuals. Not yet presently

available in many parts of the country due to bandwidth and equipment limitations for this application.

DIPLOMA.

The formal document recognizing the successful completion of a certain program of academic studies. A request for a diploma from a prospective employer usually refers to a high school diploma or its equivalent, the GED.

DISTANCE EDUCATION.

Education that takes place when the instructor and student are separated by space and/or time. The gap between the two can be bridged through the use of technology - such as audio tapes, videoconferencing, satellite broadcasts and online technology - and/or more traditional delivery methods, such as the postal service.

DISTANCE LEARNING.

See Distance Education.

DISTANCE LEARNING or DISTANCE EDUCATION COURSES

SIZE="2" COLOR="black" FACE="Tahoma">. These are courses that are taught to students who are separated by time and/or space from the instructor. Modes of delivery for these classes include: telecourses, online courses, videotaped courses, correspondence courses, or live-interactive courses.

DISTRIBUTED LEARNING.

Technology-mediated instruction that serves students both on and off campus, providing greater flexibility and eliminating time as a barrier to learning.

DOCTORAL DEGREE.

An award and formal recognition for advanced study beyond the Bachelor's and Master's degree. It generally takes

two to four years of full time course work. It is the highest degree available in most areas of study.

DOWNLOAD.

(1) to receive a data file from another computer. (2) The process of transferring software into the nodes of a

network from one node or hardware component.

DOWNLOADING.

A procedure for transferring or retrieving a file from a distant computer. Opposite of uploading. Many Web sites

have links to files such that you can simply click on the link and your browser will handle the downloading of

the file(s) to your computer.


E

EDUCATIONAL PROVIDER.

A college, university, high school, non-profit agency, corporation or other entity which originates a course or program of study.

ELECTRONIC BULLETIN BOARDS

FACE="Tahoma">. Information services that can be reached via computers connected by modem and/or Internet. With

these services users can gather information, place and read electronic messages from other users, and download

available files.

ELECTRONIC MAIL.

More often called e-mail. E-mail is a fast, easy, and inexpensive way to communicate with individuals or groups

on networked computers and computers equipped for Internet access. Besides basic correspondence, with some systems

you can attach and send documents and other files.

E-LECTURE.

Text delivered via electronic mail to networked individual computers.

EXTENDED CAMPUS.

Colleges and universities deliver programs that are flexible, and often more tailormade through extended campuses,

delivered to sites throughout the community.

EXTENSION SERVICE.

The Oregon State University Extension Programs are delivered throughout the state in one-on-one sessions and in

workshops, short courses, demonstrations, satellite teleconferences, via the Internet, publications, videotape,

radio, newspaper, and periodicals. Extension service faculty are located at the OSU central campus (Corvallis)

and in every Oregon county. Extension programs/materials cover many subjects, with emphasis on agriculture, family

issues, nutrition and food safety, 4-H Youth development, forestry, energy, marine resources, and home gardening.

Extension cooperates in distance education directly with OSU Statewide.


F

FACSIMILE MACHINE (FAX)

FACE="Tahoma">. A telecopying device that electronically transmits written or graphic material over telephone lines

to produce "hard copy" at a remote location.

FULLTIME STUDENT.

For undergraduates: a student enrolled for 12 or more semester credits, or 12 or more quarter credits, or 24 contact

hours a week each term. For graduate-level: a student enrolled for 9 or more semester credits, or 9 or more quarter

credits or students involved in thesis or dissertation preparation that are considered full-time by the institution.

For first-professional: defined by the institution.

FIRST-PROFESSIONAL DEGREE

FACE="Tahoma">. An award that requires postsecondary study in the theory and practice of the knowledge and skills

required to function as an entry-level professional in certain occupational fields recognized for reporting purposes

by the U.S. Department of Education. These awards require completion of a program that meets all of the following

criteria: completion of the academic prerequisites to become licensed in a recognized profession; requires at least

two years of college-level study prior to entering the program; and is awarded after a period of study such that

the total registered time to the degree, including both pre-professional and professional study, equals at least

six academic years. First-professional degrees, while sometimes called doctoral degrees, are distinguished from

true research doctorates in that they do not include a required component of original research or a demonstration

of expertise in a field beyond that required to qualify for basic licensing examinations.


G

GED. Normally

refers to the tests of General Educational Development, which provide an opportunity to earn a high school credential.

The GED program, sponsored by the American Council on Education, enables individuals to demonstrate that they have

acquired a level of learning comparable to that of high school graduates.

GRADUATE STUDENT.

A student who holds a bachelor's or first-professional degree, and is taking courses toward an advanced degree

such as a Master's or Doctoral Degree.


H

HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA OR RECOGNIZED EQUIVALENT

COLOR="black" FACE="Tahoma">. A document certifying the successful completion of a prescribed secondary school

program of studies, or the attainment of satisfactory scores on the Tests of General Educational Development (GED)

or another state specified examination.

HOME INSTITUTION.

The institution from which you are seeking a degree.

HOST INSTITUTION.

An institution from which you may take classes which will count toward your degree at your home institution. An

institution that is cooperating with your home institution in delivering distance education courses leading to

a degree.


I

INSTRUCTIONAL MULTIMEDIA

FACE="Tahoma">. A form of computer-based training that incorporates a mix of media. Media elements often include

sound, animation, graphics, video, text. (See Multimedia)

INSTRUCTIONAL TELEVISION FIXED SERVICE (ITFS

COLOR="black" FACE="Tahoma">). A band of microwave frequencies set aside by the U.S. Federal Communications Commission

(FCC) exclusively for the transmission of educational programming. Often called "wireless cable," ITFS

allows the broadcast of audio, video, and data to receive sites located within approximately 20 miles. Receive

sites require a converter that changes signals to those used by a standard television. The ITFS is authorized by

the FCC for educational television in the 2.5 to 2.686 Ghz band.

INTERACTIVE VIDEO.

Use of a videodisc or CD-ROM that is controlled by a computer for an interactive education or entertainment program.

INTERNET.

A worldwide network of computer networks. It is an interconnection of large and small networks around the globe.

The Internet began in 1962 as a computer network for the U.S. military and over time has grown into a global communication

tool of many thousands of computer networks that share a common addressing scheme.

INTERNET COURSES.

Students participate in the class by using the Internet for all or part of the coursework. The instructor posts

a web page which contains all relevant course information and assignments. Communication between students and instructors

occurs by e-mail.


J

JAVA. Programming

language developed by Sun Microsystems that creates code for interactive applications that is executable on web

pages by web browsers. These Java applications can execute on any platform - Mac, PC, etc.


K


L

LICENSE.

Many professions require a license to practice in Oregon (e.g., architects, counselors, dentists, dieticians, engineers,

geologists, lawyers, physicians, nurses, pharmacists, physical therapists, teachers, veterinarians). Licenses are

granted by a licensing board in accordance with state law. Most licenses require successful completion of a degree

from an accredited college or university, and in many cases, passing a required examination and/or successfully

completing a required, supervised clinical/practicum of a specified number of hours.

LISTSERV.

Mailing list program for communicating with other people who have subscribed to the same list. Using e-mail, you

can participate in listservs pertaining to your topics of interest. When you submit a message to the server, your

message is relayed to all those on the listserv. You receive messages from other participants via e-mail. It is

similar to computer conferencing, but a listserv is asynchronous.

LOGGING ON.

Connecting to a computer network, typically by using a personalized identification code.

LOWER DIVISION COURSES

FACE="Tahoma">. These courses are numbered at the 100 or 200 level. No courses above this numbering are offered

by community colleges. Many students complete all of the required 100 and 200 level courses at a community college

before transferring to a four-year college or university.


M

MASTER'S DEGREE.

A U.S. academic award that requires the successful completion of a program of study of at least one (or the full-time

equivalent of), but not more than two, traditional, credit-based academic years of work beyond the bachelor's degree.

MODEM. Equipment

that converts digital signals into analog signals for transmission over a telephone line. Signal is then converted

back to digital form so that it can be processed by a receiving computer. Modems are typically used to link computers

via telephone lines. Short for modulator-demodulator. Typical modems for home use are 14.4 kbps. 14 kilobytes per

second translates into a transmission or receiving rate of approximately 1600 bytes per second.

MULTIMEDIA.

The integration of video, graphics, and audio through the computer.

MULTI-POINT VIDEOCONFERENCE

FACE="Tahoma">. A videoconference with three or more sites. Sites must connect via a video bridge.


N

NONCREDIT COURSE.

A course or activity carrying no academic credit applicable toward a degree, diploma, certificate, or other formal

award. Corporations or nonprofit organizations may offer noncredit courses.


O

ONE-WAY VIDEO/TWO-WAY AUDIO

FACE="Tahoma">. An interactive conference, class, or meeting in which participants see and hear the speaker(s)

at the originating site as well as hear participants at other receiving sites. Two-way audio conferencing is used

for the real-time verbal interaction.

ONLINE COURSES.

Computer based instruction in which courses use the world wide web as the primary delivery method of information.

A text book may or may not be required and all other materials, as well as communication with the instructor, are

provided through the course web-site. Web-based instruction is often used interchangeably with online

courses.


P

POSTBACCALAUREATE CERTIFICATE

FACE="Tahoma">. An award that requires completion of an organized program of study requiring 30 credit hours beyond

the bachelor's; designed for persons who have completed a baccalaureate degree, but do not meet the requirements

of academic degrees carrying the title of master's degree.

POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION

FACE="Tahoma">. A formal instructional program whose curriculum is designed for students who have completed the

requirements for a high school diploma or its equivalent. This includes programs whose purpose is academic, vocational,

and continuing professional education, and excludes avocational and adult basic education programs.

PREREQUISITE.

Skills and/or knowledge a student must possess and demonstrate to the satisfaction of an instructor prior to enrolling

and taking a class. For example, knowing how to create spreadsheets may be a prerequisite for a class on business

accounting.

PRINT. A

foundational element of distance education programs and the basis from which all the other delivery modes have

evolved. Print formats include: textbooks, study guides, workbooks, course syllabi, case studies, tests, etc.

PRINT CORRESPONDENCE.

See Correspondence.

PRIVATE INSTITUTION.

A college, university or other entity which provides courses and is controlled and operated by a private individual,

non-governmental non-profit agency, or for-profit organization. It is funded primarily through tuition, donations,

and sources other than public funds. In Oregon, private colleges and universities are referred to as Independent

colleges and universities.

PROGRAM.

A combination of courses and related activities organized for the attainment of broad educational objectives described

by the institution.

PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS.

Institutions which are supported primarily through public funds. This includes state universities and community

colleges.


Q


R

REAL TIME.

An application in which information is received and immediately responded to without any time delay. See Synchronous.

RECEIVING SITES.

All sites, other than the originating site, participating in a course or meeting that is distributed with technology

such as audio conferencing or videoconferencing.

REQUIRED FEES.

Fixed sum charged to students for items not covered by tuition.


S

SEARCHABLE CATALOG.

See Catalog.

SELF-PACED.

These classes are typically asynchronous or have a flexible schedule; a student does the work when he/she has time

available. The student is not expected to proceed through this self-paced course with a cohort or group. There

often is a maximum time limit that the student may take to complete the class, but this time limit is usually far

longer than it takes to complete the material. An example is a correspondence class.

SYNCHRONOUS.

A type of two-way communication with virtually no time delay, allowing participants to respond in real time. Also,

a system in which regularly occurring events in timed intervals are kept in step using some form of electronic

clocking mechanism. (See Asynchronous)


T

TELECONFERENCE.

Simultaneous conference to multiple sites distributed via audio (phone or other audio). Satellite videoconferences

and videoconferences using compressed video are sometimes referred to as "teleconferences." To distinguish

more accurately between these frequently used terms, using the term which uniquely describes the communication

is preferred.

TELECOURSE.

A telecourse is a coordinated learning system based on a series of television programs. It is supplemented by printed

materials (text, study guide, readings) and local faculty involvement in the form of lectures, and/or consultation.

The telecourse programs may be viewed in a variety of ways. Most are broadcast over local cable stations. Program

tapes are also available for viewing on local campuses or at the colleges' outlying centers. A few colleges have

tapes available for checkout. Students also have the option of renting tapes from outside agencies.

TELEPHONE BRIDGE.

Computerized switching system which allows multi-site telephone conferencing.

TERM. Most

postsecondary institutions in Oregon function on quarter-terms, which is approximately an eleven-week period of

study. Fall term begins sometime in September and is completed in mid-December. Winter term begins in January and

ends mid-March. Spring term starts toward the end of March and lasts until early to mid-June. Summer term begins

the middle or late June and ends sometime in August. Some institutions function on terms called semesters which

are typically fifteen weeks of study.

TERM-BASED.

These classes have a fixed beginning and end date. The student often takes the class with a cohort or group. These

classes are completed in more than one week's time and traditionally are quarter, semester, and trimester classes.

TUITION.

Amount of money charged to students for instructional services. At some institutions tuition may be charged on

a per term, per course, or per-credit basis.

TWO-WAY AUDIO.

Instruction is transmitted via any means that supports two-way audio communications, including ordinary phone lines.

Two typical configurations are: (1) an instructor in one location creates a virtual class comprised of students

phoning in from many locations, and (2) an instructor in one location creates a virtual class comprised of one

or more physical classrooms. Each physical classroom may have 10-20 students present. Physical classrooms are generally

managed by a non-academic proctor who is responsible for carrying out the instructor's physical tasks by proxy.

Most two-way audio conferencing employs new technologies to permit conversations to flow simultaneously in both

directions.

TWO-WAY VIDEO.

This form of distance education is similar to one-way video except that students are almost always grouped in one

or more classrooms. Students may interact with the instructor and, possibly, members of the parallel physical classrooms.

This approach employs standard television studio and transmission technology to extend the traditional small-to-mid-size

classroom mode. New technologies permit participants to see both sides of the video transmission simultaneously.

TWO-WAY VIDEO/TWO-WAY AUDIO

FACE="Tahoma">. Interactive video in which all sites are in visual contact with one another. Some form of audio

conferencing is used for real-time verbal interaction.


U

UNDERGRADUATE.

A student who is taking courses toward an Associate of Arts or Bachelor's Degree. Undergraduate may also refer

to the courses leading to those degrees. Undergraduate courses usually have numbers 100 through 400.

URL (UNIFORM RESOURCE LOCATOR)

FACE="Tahoma">. The address system used by the Internet to locate resources such as web sites. A URL includes the

type of resource being accessed (such as gopher or hypertext), the address of the server, and the location of the

file. For example, the complete URL for the PHTN web site is <http://www.cdc.gov/phtn/index.htm>. "http://"

indicates the access method as Hyper Text Transfer Protocol. "www.cdc.gov" is the address of the server.

"/phtn/" specifies the directory in which the file is located. "index.html" is the initial

page of the PHTN web site. Web browsers will assume "http://" and "index.html", so you can

simply use <www.cdc.gov/phtn> as the URL.


V

VIDEOCONFERENCE/ING.

The linking together of individuals and groups by means of telecommunications networks and video technology, so

that people in remote locations can participate in "meetings" where one or several of the participants

is "present" in the form of a live video link displayed on video monitors.

VIDEO BRIDGE.

Specialized equipment that permits three or more locations to be joined together in a videoconference.

VIDEOTAPED COURSES.

On-campus classes are videotaped and then sent to the college's outlying centers where they are available to students

who have enrolled in that class. Some of these tapes may be mailed directly to the student for viewing.


W

WEB. See

World Wide Web.

WEB-BASED INSTRUCTION (WBI)

FACE="Tahoma">. A form of computer-based instruction which uses the World Wide Web as the primary delivery method

of information. A textbook is usually required and all other materials, as well as communication with the instructor,

are provided through the course web-site. The terms "on-line courses" and "web-based instruction"

are sometimes used interchangeably with WBT.

WEB-BASED TRAINING (WBT)

FACE="Tahoma">. A form of computer-based training in which the training material resides on web pages accessible

through the World Wide Web. Typical media elements used are text and graphics. Other media such as animation, audio,

and video can be used, but require more bandwidth and in some cases additional software.

WORKSTATION.

Colloquial use by computer users is changing the meaning of workstation into any computer or terminal where work

is performed.

WORLD WIDE WEB.

Loosely used, the WWW (or Web) refers to the whole constellation of resources that can be accessed using gopher,

FTP, HTTP, Telnet, Usenet, WAIS, and some other tools. The WWW is a hypertext-based, distributed information system

originally created by researchers at CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics, to facilitate sharing

research information. The Web presents the user with documents, called web pages, full of links to other documents

or information systems. Selecting one of these links, the user can access more information about a particular topic.

Web pages include text as well as multimedia (images, video, animation, sound). Servers are connected to the Internet

to allow users to traverse ("surf") the Web using a Web browser.


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